Class 7 RSS Exercise

By ranfanranfan (1254505842|%a, %b %e at %I:%M%p)

"home" search engine: 5,6: Bloglines
Questions: Starbucks +coffee industry

Useful results: results that show me Starbuck's role within the coffee industry or tell me something about starbucks
Not Useful results: posts irrelevant to starbucks

2. Gathering your data

  1. Submit the query to each search tool. Do this within 30 minutes from beginning to end. The reason for this requirement is that the databases change over time and we want each search engine to have an equal opportunity.
  2. Print out a list of the first 10 resources as returned by each search engine. You will be using these pages to do your analysis (see below). Change your question if an appropriate query doesn't return at least 10 results for all of the search engines.
  3. Before closing the Web page, save the page to your file space. The reason for doing that is so that you can use the links embedded in the page later in the assignment. The printouts themselves are often not sufficient for finding the Web page itself; some parts don't print sometimes.

3. Analyzing your data

Report on the results in the following way:

  1. For these first 10 resources returned by the search engine, determine which of the RSS entries (not blogs!) are applicable and useful. You should look at each entry (not just their summaries) in order to determine this. On the printout you should write a P (for precision) in the right margin next to an entry that you consider to be applicable and useful.
    • An indented result (that is, some sub-page of a site just listed) counts as one of these "resources".
    • If there is a group of images listed as a resource, then that group of images counts as one resource. You'll have to judge the whole group as to whether it's applicable and useful.
  2. Now you need to summarize the results for each search engine.
    • Count up the number of times you wrote P on each page.
    • Write down the results for rows [1] — [4] in the table below.
  3. Determine the overlap of the results returned by the different search engines; that is, we're going to count the number of times a result for one search engine (whether relevant or not) appears in the results of another search engine.
    • Bloglines/Google Blog Search
      • On the Bloglines printout, go through each resource, and if you find it on the GoogBlog results, then put a G in the right margin next to the resource on the Bloglines printout.
      • Count up the number of times you wrote G and put this number on line [5].
    • Bloglines/IceRocket
      • On the Bloglines printout, go through each resource, and if you find it on the IceRocket results, then put a I in the right margin next to the resource on the Bloglines printout.
      • Count up the number of times you wrote I and put this number on line [6].
    • Bloglines/Technorati
      • On the Bloglines printout, go through each resource, and if you find it on the Technorati results, then put a T in the right margin next to the resource on the Bloglines printout.
      • Count up the number of times you wrote T and put this number on line [7].
    • Google Blog Search/IceRocket
      • On the GoogBlog printout, go through each resource, and if you find it on the IceRocket results, then put a I in the right margin next to the resource on the GoogBlog printout.
      • Count up the number of times you wrote I and put this number on line [8].
    • Google Blog Search/Technorati
      • On the GoogBlog printout, go through each resource, and if you find it on the Technorati results, then put a T in the right margin next to the resource on the GoogBlog printout.
      • Count up the number of times you wrote T and put this number on line [9].
    • IceRocket/Technorati
      • On the IceRocket printout, go through each resource, and if you find it on the Technorati results, then put a T in the right margin next to the resource on the IceRocket printout.
      • Count up the number of times you wrote T and put this number on line [10].
  4. Determine the overlap of the results returned by all of the search engines; that is, we're going to count the number of times a result appeared in all of the search engines.
    • On the Bloglines printout, go through each resource and count up how many have a G, a I, and a T next to it.
    • Put this number on line [11].
Data Your value
[1] Bloglines precision 6
[2] GoogBlog precision 6
[3] IceRocket precision 1
[4] Technorati precision 3
[5] Overlap(B,G) 0
[6] Overlap(B,I) 0
[7] Overlap(B,T) 1
[8] Overlap(G,I) 0
[9] Overlap(G,T) 0
[10] Overlap(I,T) 0
[11] Overlap(G,B,I,T) 0

Again, these numbers are a simple count of either the precision values or the overlap values. I will do all the calculations later.

4. How to wrap it up

  1. You need to add your data to this page by Sunday at 5pm. View the page after you add the data to it to see that you formatted it correctly.
  2. You also need to keep those search results output pages. We might be using them again.

I will take all of your data, consolidate it, and report back to the class what the results are.

http://brainstormtech.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/2009/10/02/starbucks-new-high-tech-coffee/

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